Rob's roles and responsibilities…

Rob will help you with
any level of government

Rob helpsRob helps

You can call Mayor Rob Burton. He likes to help.

As Mayor, Rob serves on the Council of the Town of Oakville and on the Council of the Regional Municipality of Halton. For many years now, Rob also serves on the Halton Police Board, where he is Chair.

Each council uses about the same amount of your property tax to provide your municipal services.

Halton is a partnership of Burlington, Halton Hills, Milton, and Oakville to provide larger scale infrastructure and services such as collection and management of garbage and waste water and water services.

As Mayor, Rob has one vote at each council and committee he serves on.

Official

  • Oakville Town Head of Council & CEO
    (2006-present)
  • Oakville Community Leaders Round Table founder & host
    (2009-present)
  • Oakville Enterprises Corporation Director
    (2007-present)
  • Oakville Hydro Electricity Distribution Incorporated Director
    (2007-present)
  • Oakville Municipal Development Corporation Director and Founder
    (2018-present)
  • Halton Region Council
    (2006-present)
  • Halton Region Council Administration & Finance Committee
    (2006-2008)
  • Halton Region Council Health & Social Services Committee
    (2009-present, chair 2017-present)
  • Halton Community Housing Corporation Board
    (2009-present; president 2014-present)
  • Halton Region Council Planning & Public Works Committee
    (2008-2009)
  • Halton Conservation Authority Board
    (2015-present)
  • Halton Police Services Board
    (2011-present, chair 2014-present)

Voluntary

  • GTAH Mayors and Regional Chairs
    (2006-present)
  • Large Urban Mayors Caucus of Ontario
    (2006-present)
  • Halton Healthcare Services Director
    (2006-present)
  • Auto Mayors Caucus Chair, founder
    (2008-present)
  • Municipal Leaders for the Greenbelt co-Chair
    (2006-present)
  • Nuclear Technology Mayors Caucus co-Chair, founder
    (2009-present)
  • Ontario Association of Police Service Boards member
    (2011-present)
  • Ontario Big 12 Police Service Boards member
    (2011-present)
  • Tree Canada Director
    (2012-2016)

Municipal powers…

Our 2 Councils decide
the local services we have

In Oakville, we've had a "split-level" or two-layer local government since 1974, the Town of Oakville and the Regional Municipality of Halton. The Province of Ontario took away half of Oakville's municipal powers and gave them to the Regional Municipality of Halton. Governance of the Region is shared among its 4 "Local Municipalities": Burlington, Halton Hills, Milton, and Oakville.

In the Municipal Act, each municipal layer is assigned some exclusive and some shared jurisdictions for municipal services. The Ontario Legislature has decided "who can do what" by providing for services from each level or layer of our municipal structure.

In Halton, we work to avoid overlap and duplication wherever we can, to be more efficient with taxpayers' money. (Click this line to see "Spheres of Jurisdiction" article on this page.)

Before we do something at the local level, we check to see if it can be done better in partnership with the three other partner communities of Halton: Burlington, Halton Hills, and Milton.

For detailed information on what you can expect Councils can and cannot do, and what it means to be a Member of a Council, consult the Provincially issued "Councillor's Guide".

Duties in Municipal Act…

Duties & Responsibilities

Mayor as Head of Council
Role of head of council

225. It is the role of the head of council,
(a) to act as chief executive officer of the municipality;
(b) to preside over council meetings so that its business can be carried out efficiently and effectively;
(c) to provide leadership to the council;
(c.1) without limiting clause (c), to provide information and recommendations to the council with respect to the role of council described in clauses 224 (d) and (d.1);

(d) to represent the municipality at official functions; and
(e) to carry out the duties of the head of council under this or any other Act. 2001, c. 25, s. 225; 2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 100.

Mayor as CEO
Head of council as chief executive officer

226.1 As chief executive officer of a municipality, the head of council shall,
(a) uphold and promote the purposes of the municipality;
(b) promote public involvement in the municipality’s activities;
(c) act as the representative of the municipality both within and outside the municipality, and promote the municipality locally, nationally and internationally; and
(d) participate in and foster activities that enhance the economic, social and environmental well-being of the municipality and its residents. 2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 101.

Mayor as Council Member
Role of Council

224. It is the role of council,
(a) to represent the public and to consider the well-being and interests of the municipality;
(b) to develop and evaluate the policies and programs of the municipality;
(c) to determine which services the municipality provides;
(d) to ensure that administrative policies, practices and procedures and controllership policies, practices and procedures are in place to implement the decisions of council;
(d.1) to ensure the accountability and transparency of the operations of the municipality, including the activities of the senior management of the municipality;

(e) to maintain the financial integrity of the municipality; and
(f) to carry out the duties of council under this or any other Act.

Who does what…

...from the Ontario Municipal Act:

Spheres of Jurisdiction

Broad authority, lower-tier (Oakville) and upper-tier (Halton) municipalities

11 (1) A lower-tier municipality and an upper-tier municipality may provide any service or thing that the municipality considers necessary or desirable for the public, subject to the rules set out in subsection (4).  2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 8.

By-laws

(2) A lower-tier municipality and an upper-tier municipality may pass by-laws, subject to the rules set out in subsection (4), respecting the following matters:

1. Governance structure of the municipality and its local boards.

2. Accountability and transparency of the municipality and its operations and of its local boards and their operations.

3. Financial management of the municipality and its local boards.

4. Public assets of the municipality acquired for the purpose of exercising its authority under this or any other Act.

5. Economic, social and environmental well-being of the municipality, including respecting climate change.

6. Health, safety and well-being of persons.

7. Services and things that the municipality is authorized to provide under subsection (1).

8. Protection of persons and property, including consumer protection.  2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 8; 2017, c. 10, Sched. 1, s. 2.

By-laws re: matters within spheres of jurisdiction

(3) A lower-tier municipality and an upper-tier municipality may pass by-laws, subject to the rules set out in subsection (4), respecting matters within the following spheres of jurisdiction:

1. Highways, including parking and traffic on highways.

2. Transportation systems, other than highways.

3. Waste management.

4. Public utilities.

5. Culture, parks, recreation and heritage.

6. Drainage and flood control, except storm sewers.

7. Structures, including fences and signs.

8. Parking, except on highways.

9. Animals.

10. Economic development services. 

11. Business licensing.  2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 8.

Rules

(4) The following are the rules referred to in subsections (1), (2) and (3):

1. If a sphere or part of a sphere of jurisdiction is not assigned to an upper-tier municipality by the Table to this section, the upper-tier municipality does not have the power to pass by-laws under that sphere or part and does not have the power to pass by-laws under subsection (1) or (2) that, but for this paragraph, could also be passed under that sphere or part.

2. If a sphere or part of a sphere of jurisdiction is assigned to an upper-tier municipality exclusively by the Table to this section, its lower-tier municipalities do not have the power to pass by-laws under that sphere or part and do not have the power to pass by-laws under subsection (1) or (2) that, but for this paragraph, could also be passed under that sphere or part.

3. If a sphere or part of a sphere of jurisdiction is assigned to an upper-tier municipality non-exclusively by the Table to this section, both the upper-tier municipality and its lower-tier municipalities have the power to pass by-laws under that sphere or part.

4. If a lower-tier municipality has the power under a specific provision of this Act, other than this section, or any other Act to pass a by-law, its upper-tier municipality does not have the power to pass the by-law under this section.

5. If an upper-tier municipality has the power under a specific provision of this Act, other than this section, or any other Act to pass a by-law, a lower-tier municipality of the upper-tier municipality does not have the power to pass the by-law under this section.

6. Paragraphs 4 and 5 apply to limit the powers of a municipality despite the inclusion of the words “without limiting sections 9, 10 and 11” or any similar form of words in the specific provision.

7. The power of a municipality with respect to the following matters is not affected by paragraph 4 or 5, as the case may be:

i. prohibiting or regulating the placement or erection of any sign, notice or advertising device within 400 metres of any limit of an upper-tier highway,

ii. any other matter prescribed by the Minister.  2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 8.

One power not affecting another

(5) The power to pass a by-law respecting a matter set out in a paragraph of subsection (2) or (3) is not limited or restricted by the power to pass a by-law respecting a matter set out in another paragraph of subsection (2) or (3).  2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 8.

Services or things provided by others

(6) The power of a municipality to pass a by-law respecting the matter set out in paragraph 7 of subsection (2) does not include the power to pass a by-law respecting services or things provided by a person other than the municipality or a municipal service board of the municipality.  2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 8.

Services or things provided by other tier

(7) The power of a municipality to pass a by-law under subsection (3) under each sphere of jurisdiction does not, except as otherwise provided, include the power to pass a by-law respecting services or things provided by its upper-tier or lower-tier municipality, as the case may be, of the type authorized by that sphere.  2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 8.

Services or things provided by others

(8) The power of a municipality to pass a by-law under subsection (3) under the following spheres of jurisdiction does not, except as otherwise provided, include the power to pass a by-law respecting services or things provided by any person, other than the municipality or a municipal service board of the municipality, of the type authorized by that sphere:

1. Public utilities.

2. Waste management.

3. Highways, including parking and traffic on highways.

4. Transportation systems, other than highways.

5. Culture, parks, recreation and heritage.

6. Parking, except on highways.  2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 8.

Exception

(9) Nothing in subsection (6), (7) or (8) prevents a municipality passing a by-law with respect to services or things provided by any person to the extent necessary,

(a) to ensure the physical operation of a system of the municipality or of a municipal service board of the municipality is not impaired; or

(b) to ensure the municipality, a municipal service board of the municipality or a system of the municipality or municipal service board meet any provincial standards or regulations that apply to them.  2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 8.

Definition

(10) In this section,

“local board” means a local board as defined in section 10.  2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 8.

Regulations

(11) The Minister may make regulations prescribing matters for the purpose of subparagraph 7 ii of subsection (4).  2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 8.

TABLE

Item

Sphere of Jurisdiction

Part of Sphere Assigned

Upper-tier Municipality (ies) to which Part of Sphere Assigned

Exclusive or Non-Exclusive Assignment

1.

Highways, including parking and traffic on highways

Whole sphere

All upper-tier municipalities

Non-exclusive

2a.

Transportation systems, other than highways

Airports

All upper-tier municipalities

Non-exclusive

2b.

Transportation systems, other than highways

Ferries

All upper-tier municipalities

Non-exclusive

2c.

Transportation systems, other than highways

Disabled passenger transportation systems

Peel, Halton

Non-exclusive

2d.

Transportation systems, other than highways

Whole sphere, except airports and ferries

Waterloo, York

Exclusive

3.

Waste management

Whole sphere, except waste collection

Durham, Halton, Lambton, Oxford, Peel, Waterloo, York

Exclusive

4a.

Public utilities

Sewage treatment

All counties, Niagara, Waterloo, York

Non-exclusive

4b.

Public utilities

Sewage treatment

Durham, Halton, Muskoka, Oxford, Peel

Exclusive

4c.

Public utilities

Collection of sanitary sewage

All counties, Niagara, Waterloo, York

Non-exclusive

4d.

Public utilities

Collection of sanitary sewage

Durham, Halton, Muskoka, Oxford, Peel

Exclusive

4e.

Public utilities

Collection of storm water and other drainage from land

All upper-tier municipalities

Non-exclusive

4f.

Public utilities

Water production, treatment and storage

All upper-tier municipalities except counties

Exclusive

4g.

Public utilities

Water distribution

Niagara, Waterloo, York

Non-exclusive

4h.

Public utilities

Water distribution

Oxford, Durham, Halton, Muskoka, Peel

Exclusive

5.

Culture, parks, recreation and heritage

Whole sphere

All upper-tier municipalities

Non-exclusive

6.

Drainage and flood control, except storm sewers

Whole sphere

All upper-tier municipalities

Non-exclusive

7.

Structures, including fences and signs

Whole sphere, except fences and signs

Oxford

Non-exclusive

8.

Parking, except on highways

Municipal parking lots and structures

All upper-tier municipalities

Non-exclusive

9.

Animals

None

None

Not assigned

10a.

Economic development services

Promotion of the municipality for any purpose by the collection and dissemination of information

Durham

Exclusive

10b.

Economic development services

Promotion of the municipality for any purpose by the collection and dissemination of information

All counties, Halton, Muskoka, Niagara, Oxford, Peel, Waterloo, York

Non-exclusive

10c.

Economic development services

Acquisition, development and disposal of sites for industrial, commercial and institutional uses

Durham

Exclusive

10d.

Economic development services

Acquisition, development and disposal of sites for industrial, commercial and institutional uses

Halton, Lambton, Oxford, Waterloo

Non-exclusive

11a.

Business licensing

Owners and drivers of taxicabs, tow trucks, buses and vehicles (other than motor vehicles) used for hire
Taxicab brokers
Salvage business
Second-hand goods business

Niagara, Waterloo

Exclusive

11b.

Business licensing

Drainage business, plumbing business

York

Exclusive

11c.

Business licensing

Lodging houses, septic tank business

York

Non-exclusive


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Email - [email protected]
Telephone - (905) 338-1200
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To contact Mayor Burton officially:
Email - [email protected]
Telephone - 905-842-4111